About Jubilee

PART OF MONTGOMERY'S LEGACY

Montgomery is a town rich with history, and the Jubilee Run is proud to have been a part of this city's legacy celebrating 40 years in 2018.

The first run — originally called the Jubilee River Run & Goat-Hill Fun Run Road Races — was held April 7, 1979. Preliminary festivities took place Friday night before the race at the Montgomery Civic Center.

Former Olympic runner Jeff Galloway, his wife, Barbara, and Atlanta podiatrist Dr. Erving Miller spoke to many running fans as a warm-up for the Saturday morning race, and Galloway's comments set the stage for event — "Distance running is one of those rare things where the older you get, the better you get."

In the beginning, the race was a 10K that started at the corner of Jefferson and Tallapoosa Street in downtown Montgomery. The route wound from Tallapoosa/Coosa Streets to Upper Wetumpka Road, Federal Drive, Madison Avenue, and back to the downtown area on Dexter Avenue to the Court Square Fountain. 402 runners made it to the finish line in the 10K run under sunny skies and mild temperatures.

Fast-forward a few years, and the Jubilee River Run transitioned from a 10K to an 8K. From a safety perspective, that was a good move due to Montgomery's notorious summer heat. For years, the event coincided with the Memorial Day Weekend Jubilee CityFest event. Though the weekend festival ceased its run in 2012, the race continued.

That same year, the Alfa Insurance Relay for Life team and other employees partnered with Jubilee CityFest to handle the Jubilee CityFest Run. We’re happy to say it has continued to be a great success! We increased the numbers of runners and expanded the event to include kid’s activities, stage activities and demonstrations, as well as a Wellness Expo. We also transitioned the benefits of the run from revitalizing downtown Montgomery to raising money for the American Cancer Society's Relay for Life organization.

Today, we're proud to use this event to celebrate life, encourage survivors to continue fighting and honor those who lost their brave battle with this disease. Together, we can find a cure!